Taiwan, the United States, Japan and Australia jointly held the 2021 Global Cooperation and Training Framework (GCTF) - Workshop on Anti-Money Laundering

Release date 2021/06/08 14:22:07 Update date 2021/06/08 14:22:07 Public Affairs Office
The influence of the COVID-19 pandemic this year (2021) has resulted in many countries closing down their borders. However, the pandemic has also led to new and more diverse types of criminal activity, as criminal organizations turn to new methods of money laundering in order to hide the financial gains from their illegal activities. The Bureau, in conjunction with the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the American Institute in Taiwan (AIT), the Japan-Taiwan Exchange Association (JTEA) and the Australian Office (AO) held the "2021 Global Cooperation and Training Framework (GCTF) - Workshop on Anti-Money Laundering" on the 26th of May this year, facilitating through an online conference a discussion over enforcement of anti-money laundering experiences. This workshop had the goal of enabling our Bureau to work together with global law enforcement agencies in order to fight crime, as well as strengthen information-sharing activities and international cooperation between the agencies.
Taiwan, the United States, Japan and Australia jointly held the 2021 Global Cooperation and Training Framework (GCTF) - Workshop on Anti-Money Laundering

    The influence of the COVID-19 pandemic this year (2021) has resulted in many countries closing down their borders. However, the pandemic has also led to new and more diverse types of criminal activity, as criminal organizations turn to new methods of money laundering in order to hide the financial gains from their illegal activities. The Bureau, in conjunction with the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the American Institute in Taiwan (AIT), the Japan-Taiwan Exchange Association (JTEA) and the Australian Office (AO) held the "2021 Global Cooperation and Training Framework (GCTF) - Workshop on Anti-Money Laundering" on the 26th of May this year, facilitating through an online conference a discussion over enforcement of anti-money laundering experiences. This workshop had the goal of enabling our Bureau to work together with global law enforcement agencies in order to fight crime, as well as strengthen information-sharing activities and international cooperation between the agencies.

    The workshop opened with a series of welcoming statements made by our Bureau's Director-General Weng-Jong Leu, AO representative Jenny Bloomfield, JTEA representative Izumi Hiroyasu, AIT Director William Brent Christensen, Deputy Foreign Minister Tseng Hou-Jen and Ministry of Justice Minister Tsai Ching-Hsiang. This was followed by presentations made by representatives from the United States Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), the Asia/Pacific Group on Money Laundering (APG), the Australian Federal Police (AFP), relevant Japanese government agencies, our Bureau's Anti-Money Laundering Division and Economic Crime Prevention Division, where each representative shared case studies and experiences with money laundering from their respective countries. These presentations were streamed live world-wide, with law enforcement officials from all over the world invited to join in the discussion, and demonstrated Taiwan's ability to make contributions to international society while also fostering greater international participation for our law enforcement agencies.

    Our Bureau first participated in the GCTF in 2018, hosting and organizing sessions for the "International Workshop on Combating Transnational Crime and Improving Forensic Science for Verifying the Authenticity of United States Currency and Passports" that same year, and the "International Training Workshop on Fighting Corruption in the Public and Private Sector" in 2019. This participation has led to concrete improvements in our ability to combat transnational crimes, conduct forensic investigations, establish ethical and effective government structures and protect commercial secrets, thus raising our country's overall competitiveness. The topics of discussion in last year's workshop focused on the new types of criminal activity spreading as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, such as the spreading of disinformation, as well as hoarding of medical supplies or scams related to medical equipment. The persistence of the pandemic this year has led to fewer physical transactions being made by the public, and a rise in Internet-based transactions conducted through online payment platforms. This has cultivated an environment for illegal hacking and the hiding of criminal gains. In view of this situation, this year's workshop focused on reviewing the experiences and results of Taiwanese, American, Japanese and Australian anti-money laundering agencies. More than 500 law enforcement personnel from over 30 different countries were invited to participate in the online discussion. (Due to time zone differences, only approximately 280 law enforcement personnel from the different countries were online concurrently.) The goal was to establish friendly working relations between law enforcement from different countries, thereby raising global awareness of and increasing cooperation over the issues being discussed.